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Clown Anemonefish - Finding Nemo

Written By Mahdi Wiyanto on Tuesday, September 21, 2010 | 12:48:00 PM

Family name: Pomacentridae
Order name: Perciformes
Common name: Clownfish / clown anemonefish
Scientific name: Amphiprion percula

About twenty-nine species are recognized, one in the genus Premnas, while the remaining are in the genus Amphiprion. In the wild they all form symbiotic mutualisms with sea anemones. Depending on species, clownfish are overall yellow, orange, reddish, or blackish, and many show white bars or patches.
The largest can reach a length of 18 centimetres (7.1 in), while some can be as small as 10 centimetres (3.9 in).

Anyone probably thinks they know all there is to know about the clown anemonefish, or, simply, clownfish. What we may not know is that the heroes of Finding Nemo are actually called false anemonefish. True anemonefish, Amphiprion percula, are nearly identical, but have subtle differences in shape and live in different habitats.

There are 28 known species of anemonefish, most of which live in the shallow waters of the Indian Ocean, the Red Sea, and the western Pacific. They are not found in the Caribbean, Mediterranean, or Atlantic Ocean.
 
Surprisingly, all clownfish are born male.
They have the ability to switch their sex, but will do so only to become the dominant female of a group. The change is irreversible.

The most extraordinary fact about the clownfish is its sex-changing ability. Clown fish society has a hierarchical structure headed by a reproducing female and mating male, with a number of non-mating males waiting in the wings. Should the female die the mating male will turn into a female and choose to promote one of the non-mating males to active duty, a new dynamic to choosing the right partner!

Spawning year round, the eggs are laid in large batches around full moon, normally on a relatively flat surface near their host anemone. Both parents guard the eggs and fan them with fresh water for around 5 to 7 days. The eggs tend to hatch after darkness has descended upon the reef in an anti-predation strategy.

sumber : http://www.nationalgeographic.com , http://www.dive-the-world.com/
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2 comments:

  1. finding nemo is good man..the story got a lot of learning-info

    ReplyDelete
  2. good posting about Clown Anemonefish - Finding Nemo

    ReplyDelete

 
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